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20121112
20121120
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CSPAN2 5
CSPAN 4
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
up? let's ask wall street journal columnist bill mcguerin, and analyst steve moore and washington columnist kim strassel. so, kim, the president won reelection, was this the hand of magnimty reaching out to the republicans? >> it's crazy, it's what the president says all the time. if you listen to the press conference, he seems to say the biggest wish list for his liberal partisans has become docile letting these tax rates expire. while the republicans have moved, they are offering revenue, this is a change from their position, while the frame work is potentially there for a deal, the president no compromise, no compromise. >> paul: what's his strategy, bill, here? what is he thinking? obviously, if we don't get a deal we do go off the tax cliff and the with the consequential danger to the economy. >> kim is right, you're right, the math doesn't add up, the politics adds up. $. >> how so? >> i'm afraid what's going to happen we're not only going to get bad policy, a tax increase and so forth. but we're going to-- the republican party as opposed to bad policy are also going to get
's go to steve it's cold. yes, yes, yes. but not as cold as sunday morning when we had clear skies. saw a little ice out there. colder start, though, for many. we had a pretty cold system. a couple of degrees. yesterday was a cold day, even though this was -- was sunny. low to mid-60s today. san jose will be the warmest on this panel at 65. but a little warmer probably into wednesday. high pressure says i'm not that strong. i'm going to send everything to the north. upper 60s. maybe eke out a 70. ignore that. that's just needback from the sacramento radar a lot of 30s. plenty to go around. it could be colder in we didn't have a slight breeze. the more clouds, the more you go -- you can see them stretching right there and there. a stronger system digs offshore for wednesday. eventually the system will make our way -- make its way toward us. a lot of lead time. partly sunny to the north. some higher clouds. temperatures starting off in the 30s and 40s. we'll end up with 60s, coast, bay, inland. it will be a fine line. temperatures very close all around. santa cruz probably the warmest at
the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election that romney lost and we keep the strategy of footprint and europe would like to see what leadership. the reason i see most of the countries would seek greater involvement of the u.s., not all us paula mentioned. i wonder, a lot of reasons as you mentioned, david, the people in the united states are ready to take on that role. economic reasons from afghanistan and iraq are tired of it. the u.s. taking less of a leadership role that one day will the back and regret it is custom to the u.s. that meeting. >> and there was one over here. yes. >> thank you. -- >> name and affiliation, please. >> my name is my name is umbrella salÉ from afghanistan. immediately i have a small comment followed by a question. immediately after 9/11, the new normal west to kill and capture al qaeda taliban, bring them to justice, deny the space for mi
ticket. but the pair is accused of scamming the real winner out of the jackpot. steve osunsami is here with the latest on that. steve, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. here's why when you have a clerk check a lottery ticket to see if you won, you should sign it first and then ask for it back. andy and nael ashkar scammed one of their customers out of a winning ticket. and then, tried to claim the prize. andy ashkar claims he bought that winning ticket himself, in 2006, at a syracuse convenience store where he worked. and then waited six, long years to split the money with his brother, because he worried that the cash would negatively affect his relationship with his girlfriend. >> i would hope that at some point in the last six years, he had been convinced that she did marry him for love. >> reporter: lottery officials say that was the first clue. love or not, no one waits that long to claim $5 million. >> $5 million. >> claim it. >> waited until now. >> reporter: but they put out a detailed press release anyway, hoping it would eventually lead them to the winner. prosecutors a
about five races that we were watching very carefully. my first time was spent working with steve israel to make sure we had the resources to prevail in those races. my second time i spent was to call people who were not successful in this particular election. everybody here was getting a lot of calls -- a running is very noisy. not succeeding, the phones do not ring that much. so i wanted to hear from them, what their views were about how we go forward. then to take the calls of my colleagues to see what their view is. what i talked about here, about changing the role of money in politics, is really very important motivator for me to stay in the leader's office. i think it must be done. when people say money did not make any difference in the campaign, they all wasted their money -- that really was not true. the president of the united states, the most well known, respected person on the planet, had to spend about $1 billion to set the record straight from what that big money was putting out there. senate races, house races, tammy duckworth had $7 million spent against her of outside mo
." during the gop primaries, steve colbert started his own super pac. it was a spoof, of course. with karl rove facing backlash from his donors, who expected a vastly different return on their investment in mitt romney and other republicans, colbert offered up a response to his own donors. >> karl is in big trouble. they're going to take his thumbs. and karl is almost all thumb. i took a lot of money for my super pac and my 501c-4 colbert super pac s-h-h, which stands for shh. okay? money from some anonymous scary donors. that's not pixilated. that's his face. listen, fellows, i didn't waste your money. running a super pac is expensive. i mean, we had legitimate costs. we had handling costs, and we had legal fees, and the biggest expense, almost $90,000 of it was for the commercials the super pac ran while i was kind of sort of running for president of south carolina. i wasn't even in charge of the super pac then. >> in his home state of south carolina, of course, colbert was at one point polling ahead of a legitimate candidate, jon huntsman. >>> next, people in the other -- over 30 states
position against federal spending programs. he kicked off his programs for $68 billion in cuts. steve centanni live in washington. tell us about this report, what is in it. >> the report on spending in the department of defense is called the department of everything, and recommends specific cuts over ten years in five main areas of concern. the report says in part, these areas are merely a starting point for reviewing pentagon spending that is unnecessary, duplicative, wasteful or simply not related to defense. we must refocus the pentagon on its true mission, fighting and winning the nation's wars. the report highlights waste in dozens of specific programs, they include research on what fish can teach us about democracy, a study of jargon used on twitter and how it differs across the country. a reality cooking show featuring grill sergeants. a so-called starship project that included a discussion involving klingons. the fact that of babies interacting with robots. and operating 254 grocery stores worldwide. jon: there also was criticism of knee newable energy projects. >> reporter: t
. this move to michelle ng obama's father's side of the family, michelle obama's and and this is steve johnson, the first lady's great-grandmother who traveled to four cities, she was a sharecropper's daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life and she was one of the first of michele obama's and sisters to set site on chicago in 1908. this is her husband who was a minister who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother, and she arrived in illinois some time in the 1860s. the first lady describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea their roots in illinois go that far back. if you look at mary, you will understand why the family story says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i was never able to establish for sure whether that was true. this is the first lady's grandfather, a mislabeled slide, who left south carolina and arrive in chicago around 1931. this is millvinia, the owner of millvinia's brother. this is a photo, this is an amazing coat, there is
with a concussion. j cutler. >> the loss angeles lakers fired their coach. they hired steve nash as old coach from phoenix to mike antoni. phil jackson was considered however he wanted to much. >> thank you mark. it is five:06. the fed over a longer war be closed today for veterans thfederal governmee closed for veterans day. the u.s. postal service banks the dmv and some schools and libraries will be closed today. schools are not required to close check with your schools to see if your child has the day off. >> let us take a live look at the golden gate bridge this morning as we follow the weather. it is cold out there. let us check out the temperature is currently in santa rosa. 40 degrees. will rank about 23 degrees for about a high of 62 we will be right back. it was cold this morning with temperatures in to the third is. this afternoon we will see sunshine. high clouds in the distance. we will have clouds the to our north. tomorrow will be one of them compare to what we saw this weekend. we will still be on the cooler side but we will see a good mix in the '60s. looking ahead we do have wet w
to ask steve about the natural gas developments for passenger cars. i wanted to see what he thought about the prices for those. i think they are in the low $2 per gallon range. and see what the holdup is with this industry, why it hasn't taken off quicker? guest: i think the reason is because it is expensive to build a natural gas fired car. it is hard to refuel it. you cannot pull up your local gasoline station where you do now for gasoline or diesel. i think the first advances we will see a natural gas-fired vehicles will probably be in fleet vehicles. they tend to come back to the same location. you do not have to change the entire infrastructure of nearly 100,000 gasoline stations. host: anything else? steve, florida, a democrat. caller: good morning. i would like to ask a question if he could explain it to a lot of my friends. for some reason, they think because we're going to outpace saudi arabia, can you please explain to these people in oil production that if it is $150 a barrel in the united states, it is $150 in beijing, china. they all think it is our oil because it is coming o
is changing. we tell you why. and jennifer franciotti sits down with steve harvey. hqhqhqhqq ♪ just put a little bit of yourself ♪ ♪ in everything you do [ female announcer ] add your own ingredients to hamburger helper for a fresh take on a quick, delicious meal. it's one box with hundreds of possibilities. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> the fda uncovered a possible danger related to 5 hour energy shots you see almost everywhere. the agency said the energy drinks have been linked to 13 deaths, 92 life threatening incidents since 2008. those incidents include heart attacks, con vul shuns and at least one miscarriage. the report comes a month after the fda said monster energy drinks were at risk. >>> the risk of autism may be higher in mothers who contracted the flu or had a fever for more than a week during pregnancy. it included 97,000 children born in denmark between 1997 and 2003. chi
, as will the head of the d triple c, chairman johns for the house races, steve israel of new york, news conference coming at 2:00 eastern. we'll likely have it for you here on c-span as the house is expected to gavel out quickly at 2:00. >> what i like about c-span's coverage is it's in-depth. oftentimes you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch the communicators, i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking. i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. the lame duck session starts at 2:00 p.m. eastern. until then part of this morning's "washington journal." host: we are back with the former senator from indiana served as democrat for that state from 1999 to 2011. now co-founder of the no labels organization. senator bayh, let me begin with the petraeus resignation. what's your reaction? you served on the intelligence
to immigration. >> i was an immigration lawyer for 15 years, so as a conservative voice i understand what steve is saying, but i think we have to realize as republican party that we're never going to be a majority party if we don't figure out a way to reach to the hispanic, to reach the hispanic community. so we have defined what i call, and i been talking about this for two years but where to find a conservative consensus on immigration. we have to figure out how steve and i are going to sit and agree on a bill, and people at this table that will actually do something about a broken immigration system. one of the biggest things can service talk about often is that we want to fix a broken government. well, if you know anything about immigration law, the immigration system is absolutely broken in the united states. we need to get away that people can come to the united states to a legal system. we have to do something about border protection, i'm a big fan doing something with e-verify. all those things we have to do, but at the same time we have to forget what we pashtun we can't keep punting t
to love and em pa think that extends all boundaries. steve shinekin. [applause] the race to build and steal the world's most dangerous weapon. published by flash point, an imprint of roaring book press. a rivetting thriller of a book that tells the birth of a new age. to all these writers, thank you. thank you for your work. and thank you for what it will mean to young readers in our nation. this year's national award for young people literature goes to william alexander. ♪ [applause] ♪ >> we are proof that alternate universe exists. there has to be endanger takes the film. there's one a little further away. it was written bay author, i think it won it both times. there's -- and just another step sideways where we're standing "out of reach" it has to take it home for creating such substance out a wrenching absence. and this moment just a little step away from we're are. we're also being reminded of the devastating importance of narrative in "never fall down" and if we exclude that set of earth's already destroyed by the bomb, and instead consider the set that survives to the n
for an adjective that captured this gentleman and i came up with this one, electric, steve clemens who is with the atlantic now and has been a great source here. of course the newseum shelby coffey who's been a key architect of this event. this year we are doing something different. we welcome a new partnership in the harvard institute of politics who've carried of the elections in side of the program track and so i would like to extend a sincere thanks to the director of the harvard institute of politics. and now i would like to thank our important presenting underwriters have made this event possible, and they are altria, bank of america, comcast, exxonmobil, thompson reuters and united technologies and the supporting underwriters of the american federation of teachers and the center for auto quality, and then for drinks tonight well-deserved drinks at the reception, the underwriter is google. finally if you're housekeeping notes. we are going to run the program straight through without breaks so you can infer what that means. please, silence your cell phone and this is just your rin
traipsing across her lawn. and some of the claims she made on that call. >>> new york congressman steve israel is going to join us this morning. pennsylvania congresswoman allison schwartz, general james "spider" marks joins us, and patty murray. newt gingrich and callista gingrich will join us. they've written his and her books. going to talk about what the republican party needs to do as it moves ahead. and we'll talk to oliver stone. he's written a lot and done a number of movies on historical events. whether it's vietnam or jfk's assassination. but he says history as we know it is all wrong, and that there's an untold history. yes. an untold history. he'll tell us what that's all about. >> all wrong? >> completely wrong. throw away everything you knew. you thought you knew. wrong. >> we're going to tune in for that. >> oliver stone. >> 54 minutes past the hour. it's been more than two weeks since superstorm sandy struck. thousands of people on new york's long island are still in the dark. >> and much of the anger has been districted at the long island power authority, or lipa as it'
announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> it is 46 past the hour. >> you can stop that now. >> yeah, it's disturbing, actually. >> no, no, no -- >> you're scaring debbie. >> she's giggling. >> it's -- >> that's nervous laughter. she'd rather not be there. >> let's see the dance again. >> see what i mean? >> with us now, mika, who do we have? >> democratic representative from florida and chairwoman of the democratic national convention, congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz. committee, yes. good to have you onboard. >> good to be here. >> maybe you can speak better than me, i'm half asleep. >> mark haleprin has the first question. >> all right. a lot of questions about nancy pelosi a
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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